The Healthiest Way To Start Your Day

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Your morning dictates how the rest of your day will go, especially when it comes to your health and making healthy choices.

When you choose to start your day in a healthy way, both physically and mentally, you’re setting a precedent for yourself.

More so, you’re setting a standard that says you won’t settle for anything less than what is best for you and your body.

 I want to share with you a simple and delicious way to start your day the healthy way, which will have you feeling energized and ready to take on the world.

Your Morning Health “Cocktail”

Ingredients:

#1: 8-12oz of filtered warm water
#2: tbs of Apple Cider Vinegar
#3: half lemon(squeezed)

As soon as you wake up in the morning, I recommend making this healthy “cocktail”, which comprises of just three ingredients – water, lemon juice, and apple cider vinegar.

All you have to do is add each ingredient into a glass at the recommended doses, stir, and drink.

Don’t be fooled by the simplicity of this drink because it packs quiet the energizing punch.

And a ton of health benefits along with.

One of the biggest being in how it aids digestion.

Jump-starting your digestion system in the morning gives you a feeling of vitality and helps you avoid feelings of bloatedness, lethargy, and sluggishness other meals in the day may give you.

As I’ve written about in the past, your digestive system is responsible for the health of a remarkable amount of other systems in the body, including your brain.

Apple cider vinegar is made through a long, slow fermentation process, leaving it rich in bioactive components like acetic acid, gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic acid, and more, giving it potent antioxidant, antimicrobial, and many other beneficial properties.

The longer fermentation period allows for the accumulation of a non-toxic slime composed of yeast and acetic acid bacteria, known as the mother of vinegar.

“Mother” of vinegar, a cobweb-like amino acid-based substance found in unprocessed, unfiltered vinegar, and indicates your apple cider vinegar is of the best quality.

My go to brand is Bragg’s apple cider vinegar, which is organic, non-gmo, raw, and unfiltered.

Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

• Very rich in enzymes to maintain healthy guy
• Helps relieve allergies
• Lowers blood pressure
• Reduces inflammation
• Helps relieve muscle pain from workouts
• Helps dissolve kidney stones
• Helps prevent sinus infection
• Helps prevent acid reflux
• Helps prevent arthritis
• Lowers levels of fatigue

Lemon juice adds to our cocktail’s 1-2 punch by providing immune boosting levels of vitamin C, bio-flavonoids that destroy harmful free radicals in the body, aids in digestion, and many other health benefits listed below.

Benefits of Lemon Juice:

• Boosts your immune system
• Flushes out unwanted materials
• Flushes out unwanted toxins
• Is a natural blood purifier
• Helps relieve respiratory issues
• Helps aid in throat infections
• Decreases blemishes
• Decreases wrinkles
• Naturally energizes you
• Hydrating

Starting your day with this healthy cocktail is the ideal standard to set for a healthy body is a healthy mind.

Let us know your other favorite morning rituals and habits you’ve found set you up for success by leaving a comment in the comment section below.

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