Study Proves Why Organic Meat Is Healthier

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A new study compared the nutritional benefits of organic meat and milk to non-organic  and the results were pretty amazing.

An international team of experts, led by Newcastle University, UK, concluded the largest study of its kind. They looked at data from around the world, reviewing 196 papers on milk and 67 papers on meat. [R] 

The team found both organic milk and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced products.

They also found clear differences between organic and conventional milk and meat. This was both in terms of fatty-acid composition, and the concentrations of certain essential minerals and antioxidants.

In the British Journal of Nutrition, the team said the data shows a switch to organic meat and milk would go some way toward increasing our intake of nutritionally important fatty acids.

Because, omega-3s are essential to your health.

In fact, 8% of your brain by itself is made up of just omega-3 fatty acids.

The benefits of omega-3s are endless — from mental and behavioral health, to preventing premature death from disease. They include the following:

• Coronary heart disease and stroke

• Essential fatty acid deficiency in infancy (retinal and brain development)

• General brain function, including memory and Parkinson’s disease

• ADHD

• Autoimmune disorders

• Osteoporosis

• Crohn’s disease

• Cancers of the breast, colon and prostate

• Rheumatoid arthritis

Here’s how Chris Seal, professor of Food and Human Nutrition at Newcastle University, explains it …

“Western European diets are recognized as being too low in these fatty acids and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recommends we should double our intake.

“But getting enough in our diet is difficult. Our study suggests that switching to organic would go some way toward improving intakes of these important nutrients.”

Other positive changes in fat profiles included lower levels of myristic and palmitic acid in organic meat. (Those are saturated fatty acids.) It also included a lower omega-3/omega-6 ratio in organic milk.

Higher levels of fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin E and vitamin A and 40% more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in organic milk were also observed.

CLA is a type of “good” fat that actually helps the body burn more fat.

The researchers of the study concluded by saying …

“We have shown without doubt there are composition differences between organic and conventional food.

“Taken together, the three studies on crops, meat and milk suggest that a switch to organic fruit, vegetables, meat and dairy products would provide significantly higher amounts of dietary antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids.”

Do you personally eat or not eat organic meat?

Let us know your experience in the comment section below.

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