A Handful of Nuts a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

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Growing up, you were always told “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”.

But now it’s time to switch things up. 

Because while apples are packed with nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, there may be an even better daily snack to supercharge your health and immunity. 

Recently, the Imperial College London of London did a large analysis of studies done on the health benefits of tree nuts.

Their research team analyzed 29 published studies from around the world that involved up to 819,000 participants, including more than 12,000 cases of coronary heart disease, 9,000 cases of stroke, 18,000 cases of cardiovascular disease and cancer, and more than 85,000 deaths.

They found that 20g a day of nuts — equivalent to around handful — can reduce your risk of cancer by 15 percent, risk of coronary heart disease by 30 percent, and your risk of premature death by 22 percent.

Additionally, the London college also found eating a handful of nuts a day reduced your risk of dying from respiratory disease by 50%, and diabetes by almost 40 percent.

These are some pretty remarkable statistics when all that’s being added into your diet is eating a small handful of nuts.

In under a minute a day you can reduce your risk for some of the deadliest diseases known to man!

What Scientists Think About Nuts & Your Health

Study co-author Dagfinn Aune said, “We found a consistent reduction in risk across many different diseases, which is a strong indication that there is a real underlying relationship between nut consumption and different health outcomes.

It’s quite a substantial effect for such a small amount of food.”

Nuts, such as hazel nuts, walnuts, almonds, cashews, are loaded with fiber, magnesium and beneficial fats.

Aune added “ Some nuts, particularly walnuts and pecan nuts are also high in antioxidants, which can fight oxidative stress and possibly reduce cancer risk.

Even though nuts are quite high in fat, they are also high in fiber and protein, and there is some evidence that suggests nuts might actually reduce your risk of obesity over time.”

While these results and the health benefits of nuts are surely welcome in all our diets, you should be careful not to overdo them.

Since nuts are so nutrient and fat dense, it’s easy to turn one handful into five, which can become a caloric nightmare if you’re not careful.

So stick to one handful daily as a quick snack and you can benefit from all nuts have to offer.

Do you already include nuts in your diet and if so what kind?

Are you thinking of adding them into your diet now?

If you, please leave a comment in the comment section below!

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1. Dagfinn AuneEmail author, NaNa Keum, Edward Giovannucci, Lars T. Fadnes, Paolo Boffetta, Darren C. Greenwood, Serena Tonstad, Lars J. Vatten, Elio Riboli and Teresa Norat
BMC Medicine201614:207
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0730-3 The Author(s). 2016

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